Targets

​The nutrient reduction scheme of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan was revised in the 2013 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting, based on a new and more complete dataset as well as an improved modeling approach.


Maximum Allowable Inputs and needed reductions

for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in tonnes, agreed in 2013 

Baltic Sea Sub-basin

Maximum Allowable Inputs ​Reference inputs 1997-2003 ​Needed reductions ​
TN, tonnesTP, tonnesTN, tonnesTP, tonnesTN, tonnesTP, tonnes
Kattegat74,0001,68778,761 1,687 4,7610
Danish Straits65,9981,60165,998 1,601 00
Baltic Proper325,0007,360423,921 18,320 98,92110,960
Bothnian Sea79,3722,77379,372 2,773 00
Bothnian Bay57,6222,67557,622 2,675 00
Gulf of Riga88,4172,02088,417 2,328 0308
Gulf of Finland101,8003,600116,252 7,509 14,4523,909
Baltic Sea 792,20921,716910,344 36,894 118,13415,178


Progress towards the maximum allowable inputs is assessed in the core pressure indicator on nutrient inputs.


Country Allocated Reduction Targets (CARTs)

for pollution from both land and air, in tonnes, agreed in 2013

 NitrogenPhosphorus
Denmark2,89038
Estonia1,800320
Finland2,430 +600*330 +26*
Germany7,170 +500*110 +60*
Latvia1,670220
Lithuania8,9701,470
Poland143,6107,480
Russia10,380*3,790*
Sweden9,240530

The figures are rounded

1At this point in time Poland accepts the Polish Country Allocated Reduction Targets as indicative due to the ongoing national consultations, and confirms their efforts to finalize these consultations as soon as possible.

​ * Reduction requirements stemming from
- German contribution to the river Odra inputs, based on ongoing modeling approaches with MONERIS;

- Finnish contribution to inputs from river Neva catchment (via Vuoksi river)
;
- these figures include Russian contribution to inputs through Daugava, Nemunas and Pregolya rivers

The figures for transboundary inputs originating in the Contracting Parties and discharged to the Baltic Sea through other Contracting Parties are preliminary and require further discussion within relevant transboundary water management bodies.


Sources outside Baltic to reduce their share

The 2013 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting also stressed that the achievement of good environmental status for  the Baltic Sea also relies on additional reduction efforts by non-Contracting Parties:

  • 18,720 tonnes of airborne nitrogen

  • 6,930 tonnes of nitrogen from shipping

  • 3,230 tonnes of waterborne nitrogen from Belarus and Ukraine

  • 800 tonnes of waterborne phosphorus from Belarus and Ukraine


For comparison

maximum allowable inputs in
2007 Baltic Sea Action Plan

Sub-regionMaximum allowable nutrient input (tonnes)Inputs in 1997-2003 Needed reductions
PhosphorusNitrogenPhosphorusNitrogenPhosphorusNitrogen
Bothnian Bay 2,58051,4402,58051,44000
Bothnian Sea 2,46056,7902,46056,79000
Gulf of Finland 4,860106,6806,860112,6802,0006,000
Baltic Proper6,750233,25019,250327,26012,50094,000
Gulf of Riga 1,43078,4002,18078,4007500
Danish straits1,41030,8901,41045,890015,000
Kattegat 1,57044,2601,57064,260020,000
Total21,060601,72036,310736,72015,250135,000

country-wise targets in 2007 Baltic Sea Action Plan

Phosphorus (tonnes)

Nitrogen (tonnes)

Denmark

16

17,210

Estonia

220

900

Finland

150

1,200

Germany

240

5,620

Latvia

300

2,560

Lithuania

880

11,750

Poland

8,760

62,400

Russia

2,500

6,970

Sweden

290

20,780

Transboundary Common pool*

1,660

3,780

*Non-HELCOM countries